UNIX SYSTEM V ADMINISTRATION

 

General:

 

This course provides an overview of the tools and utilities available under the UNIX System V Operating System with respect to system administration. It gives the students insight into areas involved in the administration of a UNIX computer system.

 

 

Objectives:

 

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

 

         Describe what is expected of the UNIX System Administrator.

         Describe basic hardware components.

         Describe different types of software.

         Describe the layout of the UNIX file system.

         Describe the stages of boot and shutdown during the operation of the UNIX Operating System.

         Describe system backup commands and procedures.

         Identify and describe the program executed when logging in.

         Use crash to analyze an active system or system dump.

         Administer cron, at and batch jobs.

         Use sar to monitor system performance.

         Use accounting software to monitor system usage.

         Administer the uucp software system.

         Administer the lp spooling system.

         Describe security checks and balances.

 

 

Audience:

 

New System Administrators, Technical Users, and Programmers who require an understanding of the administrative responsibilities involved in managing a UNIX system.

 

 

Prerequisites:

 

Introduction to UNIX and Shell Programming courses or equivalent experience.

 

 

Duration:

 

Five (5) days including classroom lecture and lab sessions.


UNIX SYSTEM V ADMINISTRATION

COURSE OUTLINE

 


I.           INTRODUCTION

 

A.   Role of the UNIX System Administrator

B.    Site Preparation

C.    Site Maintenance

 

 

II.         HARDWARE

 

A.   General Hardware Components

B.    Communications

1.     Serial

2.     Parallel

C.    Other Devices

 

 

III.       SOFTWARE

 

A.   Types of Software

B.    Parts of the Operating System

1.     Boot Block

2.     Pump Code

3.     UNIX Operating System Versions

4.     Process/Memory Manager

5.     File System

6.     Device Drivers

7.     System Calls

 

 

IV.       FILE SYSTEM

 

A.   Maintaining the File System

B.    Parts of a File System

1.     Super Block

2.     Inode

File System Commands

 

V.         LOADING, BOOTING, AND SHUTDOWN

 

A.   BOOT Procedure

B.    init

C.    /etc/rc and /etc/brc

D.    /etc/getty and /etc/gettydefs

E.     shutdown

 

 


VI.       BACKUPS

 

A.   Devices Used

B.    When should Backups be done

C.    What should be backed up

D.    Commands

1.  volcopy

2.  find and cpio

3.  dd

4.  tar

5.  finc,and frec

6.  tapesave and filesave

7.  dcopy

 

 

VII.     LOGGING IN

 

A.   Set-Up

1.     Hardware

2.     Software

B.    User Maintenance

1.     Adding a user

2.     Deleting a user

3.     Customizing a user's environment

C.    Passwords

1.     Dialup

2.     Administrative

 

 

VIII.   MEMORY MANAGEMENT

 

A.   Concepts

B.    UNIX System Tables

1.     Process

2.     Shared Text

3.     Inode

4.     File

5.     Memory/Swap

6.     Mount

7.     Callout

8.     Device Driver

9.     Tunable Parameters


IX.       CRON AND AT

 

A.   cron Administration

1.     crontab Format

2.     Scheduling

3.     Permissions

4.     cron Log

B.    at and batch Commands

 

 

X.         MONITORING THE SYSTEM

 

A.   Features

B.  sar

C.  sag and sadp

D.  /etc/crash

E.     Additional Commands

 

 

XI.       SYSTEM ACCOUNTING

 

A.   Accounting Administration

1.     Set up

2.     Directories

3.     Data Collected

4.     Reports

5.     Commands

 

 


XII.     INTRA AND INTER COMMUNICATIONS

 

A.   Intra Communication Methods

B.    Inter Communication Methods

C.    uucp Administration

1.     Directories

2.     spool Directory

3.     uucppublic Directory

4.     Set up

5.     Commands

 

 

XIII.   CONNECTING A PRINTER

 

A.   Hardware

B.    lpadmin

C.    Debugging

 

 

XIV.   SYSTEM SECURITY

 

A.   Internal

B.    External